Monday, April 30, 2012

Our Members' Publishing Successes

The yahoos are being published early because I’m leaving on vacation. IWW members who had yahoos after six p.m. (Pacific Time) Saturday, April 28, will appear in next week's blog post, which Jody has kindly volunteered to take over until my return. Thanks, Jody!

Congratulations, everyone!

Judith

Jacquelynn Rasmenia Massoud

Eunoia Review has accepted & published a flash piece of mine, “The First,” http://eunoiareview.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/the-first/

Thanks to everyone on the fiction list who critiqued this one... I made a few changes based on your comments & really feel like it made the story better. Thanks, guys!

Mel Jacob

2 reviews up on Amazon for When Lilacs Bloom. Now to see if that leads to readers.

Also my review of Zombies, by J.R. Angelella, is up on the Internet Review of Books. (Sort of a horror story of teen coming of age in dysfunctional family. I found it depressing overall.)

Lynne Hinkley

My guest blog post, “St. Thomas, USVI: Beyond the Beach,” is up on the Caribbean Culinary Blog, “Island Pepperpot.” http://www.caribbeanculinary.blogspot.com/    

Mira Desai

Once upon a time, my neighborhood’s maze of buildings, shanty-town and glitzy hi-rises, was a jumble of forest, tiny velvet fields, and an ancient Buddhist shrine. My story, “A Kondivita Girl,” featuring a puzzled ghost, won a prize and was published in The Mahakali Voice.

This did start out as a Practice sub.

Edith Parzefall and Francene Stanley

Canada-based Double Dragon Publishing released the first book in the Higher Ground series, Wind Over Troubled Waters, on April 24th, during the night in Europe.
http://www.double-dragon-ebooks.com/single.php?ISBN=1-55404-959-8
Currently the book is on sale with a 20% discount on amazon.com, just incase you'd like to get a souvenir after all the hard work you invested inhelping us make the series shine! :-)

Joanna M. Weston

A poem, “The Stone Church,” up at Our Day's Encounter. With thanks to Pat St. Pierre for introducing me to this site.http://adaysencounter.com/wordpress/?p=802

Patricia L. Johnson

Wow, I am loving this one, and trying to keep perspective on it as I sit among my yearly editions of Best American Poetry, edited by David Lehman, from 1989 through 2011 (I missed the first year, 1988). My poem, “Dear Moon,” was shown on their blog. Here's a link:
http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2012/04/napowrimo-poems-day-22.html

Carter Jefferson

Every Saturday morning I get an e-mail from “World Wide Words,” an informative and sometimes funny linguistics website. The author, Michael Quinion, discusses the origins of two or three weird words or products of some regional dialect. It's always fascinating. But maybe the best part is at the end, where in his “Sic!” he tells us of stupid mistakes readers find in the English or American press. Here, in its entirety, is a contribution of mine that he included today:

“Carter Jefferson informs us: “The MetroBoston newspaper ran the following headline on 19 April: ‘Stray bullets nearly miss 9-year-old’. Inside the paper ‘nearly’ gets changed to ‘barely’. The kid survived.” (Note the British punctuation--that's Quinion, not me.)
Here it is. You can subscribe if you like: http://www.worldwidewords.org/nl/zlqo.htm#N5

Ellen Kombiyil

My poem, “Nothing is Forbidden,” is up at Eclectica. This is a part of their special ‘word poems’ feature -- poems in this issue contain the words heirloom, forbid, seven, boundary.
http://www.eclectica.org/v16n2/poetry_special.html

Bob Sanchez

The other day I went to the dentist and picked up a copy of the April 2012 Scientific American in the waiting area. On the inside back cover was a full-page ad for an eco-thriller entitled, Blowout, and my first thought was, “Hey, I reviewed that book for Kirkus.” The ad features three quotes from reviews, including from the one I wrote. Of course, they attributed it to Kirkus and not to me, but still. Other featured comments were from Publisher's Weekly and Bill Richardson.

Bill Backstrom

Three Line Poetry has accepted three poems (all three-lines, no titles):

Rabbit rings doorbell
Bear knocks then enters swiftly
Spring in the forest

Birds sing, soft then loud
Here I am, pick me, pick me
Spring perched in March trees

She left flowers on the hidden grave
Ever cautious that no one followed
Officially, he's only missing

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